Our changing audience

Really, who are you?
Not yet introducing the new jazz deployment wiki

In our corner of the world, some of us on the Jazz Jumpstart universe are wondering who will spill the beans and mention the new jazz Deployment wiki first. I don’t think it will be me.

We’re all working on a new way for the Jazz ecosystem to present information, specifically deployment information. Not just “Insert tab A into slot B” types of material, but the more opinionated, specific stuff you’ve told us you want to hear. We have folks working on Monitoring, Integrating, Install and Upgrade, and other deployment topics. I own the Performance Troubleshooting section.

When the actual wiki rolls out (and I can actually talk about it), I’ll talk about some of the structure and design questions we wrestled with. For now I want to talk about one of the reasons why we’re presenting information differently, and that’s because we think our audience has changed.

IT used to be simple

Ok, so may IT was never actually that simple, but it was certainly a lot easier to figure out what to do. One of IBM Rational’s strengths is that we’ve built strong relationships with our customers over the years. Personally, a lot of the customers I know (and who I think know me) started out as ClearCase or ClearQuest admins and over time have evolved now to Jazz/CLM admins. Back when, there was pretty much a direct relationship with our product admins, who in turn knew their end users and had ownership of their hardware environments.

This picture describes what I’m talking about (they’re from a slide deck we built in 2011 to talk about virtualization some of which lives on elsewhere, but these pics are too good to abandon):

aud_olditmod

The relationship between Rational Support / Development and our customers remains strong and direct. Over the years it’s the context of our customers product administrators that has shifted in many cases:

aud_newsysmod

Consolidation, regulation, governance, compliance, etc., have all created additional IT domains which are often outside the customers’ product administration. There are cases where our relationship with our customers’ product administrators remains strong but we’ve lost sight of their context.

Here’s another way to look at the old model, this is specifically around hardware ownership:

aud_oldmod2

Back in the day, our customers’ product administrators would request hardware, say a Solaris box (yes, I am talking about many years ago…), the hardware would arrive and the Rational product admin would get root privileges and start the installation. Nowadays, the hardware might be a VM, and there might be all sorts of settings which the admin can’t control such as security, database, or as is pertinent to this example, VMs.

aud_newmod2

 

This is a long winded way to say that we’re well aware we have multiple audiences, and need to remember that product administrators and IT administrators may no longer be the same people. Loving a product and managing how it’s used isn’t quite the same as it used to be. We’re trying to get better at getting useful information out there which is one of the reasons for the new deployment wiki.